News You Can Use: Tenth Circuit Holds Kansas Aggravated Robbery Isn’t a Violent Felony

In United States v. Bong, the Tenth Circuit held that Kansas aggravated robbery isn’t a violent felony for purposes of the Armed Career Criminal Act. Mr. Bong was convicted of being a felon in possession of a firearm and sentenced to more than 24 years in prison. He was sentenced under the ACCA based on at least seven prior convictions that the district court believed qualified as violent felonies: three Kansas simple robberies, three Kansas aggravated robberies, and one Kansas attempted robbery. On appeal, Mr. Bong argued that none of those prior convictions qualified as violent felonies that could trigger the ACCA, and the Tenth Circuit agreed.

By statute, Kansas defines robbery as “the taking of property from the person or presence of another by threat of bodily harm to his person or the person of another or by force.” The statute defining aggravated robbery defines that offense as “a robbery committed by a person who is armed with a dangerous weapon or who inflicts bodily harm upon any person during the course of such robbery.” At first blush, these statutes would seem to qualify as violent felonies. But a closer look revealed that they don’t qualify.

 Although the Kansas statutes seem to require force, the Kansas Supreme Court has interpreted them to require no such thing. In one case, the Kansas Supreme Court held that mere purse snatching constitutes robbery and, in a different case, held that mere possession of a weapon (absent use or brandishing) can elevate a robbery conviction to aggravated robbery.

Based on the Kansas Supreme Court’s interpretation of its robbery statutes, the Tenth Circuit held that Mr. Bong’s prior convictions did not count as violent felonies. First, as to simple robbery, the “mere snatching of a purse” — “without any application of force directly to the victim” and “without any resistance by or injury to the victim” — “falls short of the ‘violent force’ required” to qualify as a violent felony under the ACCA. Bong, Slip op. at 19-20. Second, as to aggravated robbery, “nothing about [a] defendant’s mere possession of a firearm (or another deadly weapon) would . . . necessarily cause[] the crime to involve” the use, attempted use, or threatened use of violent force required to trigger the ACCA. Id. at 23-24.

 

TAKEAWAYS

 1. Robbery offenses that can be committed by mere purse snatching don’t qualify as violent felonies under the ACCA (and likely don’t qualify as crimes of violence under the sentencing guidelines).

 2. Offenses that require simply possessing a weapon, as opposed to using or brandishing a weapon, don’t qualify as violent felonies under the ACCA (and likely don’t qualify as crimes of violence under the sentencing guidelines).

3. Even when an offense sounds like it would be a violent felony or crime of violence (Aggravated Robbery With a Deadly Weapon!), it may not qualify. Even when the statute defining an offense sounds like it defines a violent felony or crime of violence, it may not qualify. You must always look to see how the state courts have construed the statute.

 

Author: COFPD

Federal Public Defender's Office for the Districts of Colorado and Wyoming

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